South Africa

South African Banks Footprint in SADC Mining Projects

South African Banks are often key funders of a number of mining companies. Questions abound on the nature of these deals and the lack of transparency that surrounds them. There are concerns about whether banks do due diligence before they fund any mining activities to guide against corruption, social, environmental and human rights abuses that are linked to mining. This report interrogates the funding commitments of South African banks in mining in SADC and considers whether they can do things differently.

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DRC civil society meets Banro Corporation

October 08th, 2013

Meeting between civil society and Banro Corporation on issues of natural resources governance. Among topics to be debated: Banro’s industrial production and its contribution to the socio-economic development of DRC, the displacement of the Namoya community in the Maniema province and the requirements of the local population, the social realizations of the company, issues of transparency within the company and its implication in the EITI process as well as the problem of the Mukungwe mining concession and local population.

SARW Date: 
Wednesday, October 9, 2013 - 11:30
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South Africa

During the early 1990s, direct trade relations between China and South Africa were initiated, and within a relatively short period of time, two-way trade increased signif.icantly. The volume of trade in 1991 was only US$14 million, but by 1997 this had grown to over US$1,5 billion.
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S/Africa NGO condemns MMD's 'secret deals' with mines

SOUTHERN Africa Resource Watch (SARW) has accused mining investors of lacking a human heart and care for environmental and human rights issues. 
 
The South African-based civil society organisation has also condemned the MMD government for having tied the country into 'secret deals' such as 20-year contracts that have allowed mining companies investing in Zambia to pay virtually no taxes or royalties, claiming that the mines were undergoing recapitalisation. 
 

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Mine Impacts: Mine closure and completion

Step 7: Mine Closure and comple-tion. Mining is not sustainable be-cause mineral reserves are finite. This means that a mine cannot go on forever it has to close down once the mineral is finished. The mining com-pany has a responsibility to close down the mine and to restore the environment and to leave a commu-nity that is better off than when the mine started and not worse off.

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Types of Conflict

Intra-Personal Conflict. This kind of conflict takes place inside of us as persons and usually occurs when there is a difficult choice to be made. “Shall I use my last money to buy beer, or should I first see if the rest of my household is take care of in terms of their needs for food,” for example is a typical decision a head of household might have to make. It is a choice between what is enjoyable in the short run and what is right in the long run. This is a conflict an idividual must solve for him or her-self. 

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Open Conflict and Latent Conflict [Case Study: The Bafokeng]

A community might be very unhappy about mining and the impact of min-ing on the environment and on the community. However because they have an authoritarian headman or a dictatorial government they say nothing in public. They only talk amongst themselves whispering where there is no-one who could hear and report them to the authorities.

This is a very unhealthy situation because the conflict remains hidden (it is latent) and therefore no solutions can be found to deal with the problem.

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